Archive

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Interview with Dianne Saxe

November 28, 2019 Leave a comment

I had the pleasure of speaking with Dianne Saxe (@EnviroLaw) at the @MiningWatch “Turning Down the Heat” conference last week. She is the former Environment Commissioner of Ontario and she gave a very compelling presentation stressing the urgency of the climate crisis. Saxe runs a web site called SaxeFacts.org and is an internationally-recognized Canadian lawyer, rated among the top 25 environmental lawyers in the world.

 

Earthgauge News – Nov. 26, 2019

November 26, 2019 Leave a comment


Environmental news featuring stories from across Canada and around the world. Broadcast every other Tuesday at 12:00 noon EST on CKCU radio 93.1 FM in Ottawa or online at www.ckcufm.com. Or download the podcast here.

On the show this week:

  • Fossil fuel production on track for double the safe climate limit
  • KOALAS MAY BE ‘FUNCTIONALLY EXTINCT’ AFTER DEVASTATING AUSTRALIAN BUSHFIRES
  • ‘Climate Emergency’ Named Oxford Word of the Year
  • Tesla Launches a Futuristic Electric Truck
  • ZERO-EMISSION VEHICLES HIT 10% OF NEW CAR SALES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
  • FOSSIL PRODUCTION, INEFFICIENT BUILDINGS MAKE CANADA A GLOBAL CLIMATE LAGGARD
  • CHEVRON SCRAMBLES TO MOTIVATE EMPLOYEES WITH ‘MORAL CASE’ FOR FOSSIL FUELS
  • An incredible new type of “plastic” packaging could be key to feeding fish rather than killing them.

Earthgauge News – Nov. 12, 2019

November 13, 2019 Leave a comment

Environmental news featuring stories from across Canada and around the world. Broadcast every other Tuesday at 12:00 noon EST on CKCU radio 93.1 FM in Ottawa or online at www.ckcufm.com. Or download the podcast here.

On the show this week:

  • 11,000 scientists warn of ‘untold suffering’
  • Report on Toronto, Vancouver traffic reveals outsized health risks posed by trucks and SUVs
  • Keystone Leaks Crude Oil in North Dakota on Same Day as Trump State Department Pipeline Hearing
  • Massive Oil Spill Turns Brazil’s Beaches Black, Kills Marine Life, Threatens Communities
  • London Police Ban on Extinction Rebellion Ruled ‘Unlawful’
  • Concordia Promises Full Fossil Divestment by 2025
  • The UK to end fracking for good following new study 

Earthgauge News – Oct. 15, 2019

October 15, 2019 Leave a comment

Environmental news podcast featuring stories from across Canada and around the world. Broadcast every other Tuesday at 12:00 noon EST on CKCU radio 93.1 FM in Ottawa or online at www.ckcufm.com. Or download the podcast here.

On the show this week:

  • Anheuser-Busch to Launch Largest Electric Class 8 Truck Fleet in North America
  • CLEAN ENERGY TO CREATE 160,000 JOBS BY 2030 WHILE FOSSILS LOSE 50,000
  • OIL LOBBY WISH LIST WOULD DRIVE UP CANADA’S FOSSIL EMISSIONS 60% BY 2030, ANALYSIS SHOWS
  • NORWAY’S BIGGEST PENSION FUND DUMPS ALL TAR SANDS/OIL SANDS INVESTMENT
  • EXTINCTION REBELLION BRIDGE BLOCKADES AND WALL STREET ‘DIE-IN’ DRAW ATTENTION, PRODUCE IRATE DRIVERS
  • Denmark calls for phase out of diesel, gasoline cars
  • New data show how fossil fuel companies have driven climate crisis despite industry knowing dangers

Ottawa #ClimateStrike

October 1, 2019 Leave a comment


Huge climate strikes took place across Canada and around the world this past Friday, Sept. 27, with millions taking part including at least 800,000 here in Canada demanding immediate and strong action on the climate crisis, which is getting worse almost by the day. Over 20,000 people walked out of school and work here in Ottawa and I was there to capture some of the sounds from the march. In the face of so much relentless bad news these days, it was truly empowering to see the energy and determination of young people. They simply won’t back down on this one. 

Click the link above to listen to some audio from the Ottawa climate strike including inspiring interviews with two remarkable elementary school climate strikers.

 

Earthgauge Radio – Sept. 17, 2019

September 22, 2019 Leave a comment

Environmental news podcast featuring stories from across Canada and around the world. Broadcast every other Tuesday at 12:00 noon EST on CKCU radio 93.1 FM in Ottawa or online at www.ckcufm.com. Or download the podcast here.

  • CLIMATE, PIPELINE PROTESTS GREET TRUDEAU’S KICK-OFF RALLY AS ELECTION 2019 GETS UNDER WAY
  • First Crowdfunded Park in BC Saves 2K Acres From Loggers
  • Climate change a top federal election priority for First Nations, says Bellegarde
  • REPORT SHOWS CONSTRUCTION DELAYS, SAFETY ISSUES DELAYING TRANS MOUNTAIN, MAKING PIPELINE A FINANCIAL LOSER
  • Feds to study using electricity to ‘reduce or eliminate’ fossil fuels
  • Trump Moves to Open 1.5 Million Acres of Alaskan Refuge for Oil Drilling By End of the Year
  • Alarming Level of Plastic in Children’s Bodies, German Study Shows
  • Japan May Dump Radioactive Fukushima Water Into the Pacific in ‘Only Option’ of Disposal

Newfoundland preps for more offshore oil as climate crisis deepens

September 18, 2019 Leave a comment

An advance leak from the forthcoming United Nations (U.N.) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on Oceans and Cryosphere confirms that the climate crisis is deepening. According to the leak, the U.N. report concludes that changes to global oceans, glaciers, and melting permafrost will unleash disaster upon the world including drought, floods, hunger and destruction unless dramatic action is taken to reduce global carbon emissions immediately.

It is against this backdrop that the province of Newfoundland and Labrador has announced plans to drill 100 new offshore exploration wells and dramatically increase its oil production by 2030, thereby roughly tripling the oil and gas sector’s carbon emissions. The province is currently carrying out a Regional Strategic Environmental Assessment (RSEA) of its offshore exploration drilling plans, which included a climate change session.

As a participant in this process, I made the simple mathematical point during one of the sessions that the province cannot possibly meet its 2030 greenhouse gas emissions target if it proceeds with its drilling plans in the offshore. What’s more, carbon emissions from the full production of currently operating oil and gas fields and coal mines across the world will already lead to a global temperature rise above the 2 degrees Celsius limit set in Paris in 2017 by the U.N., much less the aspirational 1.5C target.

Newfoundland and Labrador’s emissions target for 2030 is 6.9 million tonnes (megatonnes) of carbon dioxide. If the province triples oil production as it intends to do, this would mean that emissions from this sector alone in 2030 would account for an estimated 4.9 Mt of this target, or 71%, making it virtually impossible for the province to reach its emissions reduction goals.

Representatives of oil companies attending the RSEA session responded by saying that, while this analysis is true, Newfoundland and Labrador’s contribution to Canada’s and the planet’s carbon emissions is small and therefore inconsequential. Moreover, the world will need oil for the foreseeable future so if oil and gas is not produced in the province, it will simply be produced elsewhere. This response is commonly heard in defense of the oil and gas industry in Canada in an effort to stymie efforts to reign in emissions and question the long-term viability of the industry.

Here’s the thing. Either we are serious about our Paris commitments or we are not. We cannot pretend we will meet our global emissions reduction targets while continuing to expand fossil fuel production at the same time. This is what is commonly known as cognitive dissonance, the act of holding two contradictory ideas in one’s head at the same time and believing them both to be true.

It is simply not true that that the world will continue to use oil and gas long at increasing rates into the future *IF* we are serious about our carbon reduction commitments. Asserting the future inevitability of oil and gas is a bet against Canada and the world meeting its Paris targets. If on the other hand, we are serious about meeting the Paris targets, then the demise of oil and gas becomes a mathematical inevitability. We cannot both expand fossil fuel production AND reduce emissions at the same time.

While it is true that some energy projections assert that the world will continue to need fossil fuels for decades to come, this is not the case if the world is to stay within 2C of warming, let alone 1.5 degrees. The International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook in 2012 stated that “No more than one-third of proven reserves of fossil fuels can be burned, leaving up to 80% of assets technically unburnable.” In 2015, the Bank of England warned that policies designed to limit carbon emissions could mean some fossil fuels become “stranded assets”, with the Bank’s governor adding that “the vast majority of reserves are unburnable if global temperature rises are to be limited to below 2 degrees C.” Even the oil giant Shell conceded in 2013 “in a world where the 2C limit is imposed and achieved, most of the future value generation of the companies involved will never be realized.”

The province of Newfoundland and Labrador, as well of the rest of Canada, has come to a moment of reckoning. Why even bother setting targets in the first place if we are not serious about meeting them?

%d bloggers like this: